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iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry

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Species-specific morphological and physiological characteristics and progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated CO2 concentration

Woo Kyung Song (1-2), Si Yeon Byeon (2), HoonTaek Lee (1-2), Min Su Lee (2), Daun Ryu (3), Jun Won Kang (4), Sim Hee Han (5), Chang Young Oh (6), Hyun Seok Kim (2-3-7-8)   

iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, Volume 13, Issue 4, Pages 270-278 (2020)
doi: https://doi.org/10.3832/ifor3288-013
Published: Jul 03, 2020 - Copyright © 2020 SISEF

Research Articles


Elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) concentration initially enhances photosynthesis, growth and ecosystem productivity, but the excessive use of nitrogen due to the increased productivity causes uncertainty in long-term ecosystem responses. We exposed Korean red pine, Chinese ash, and Korean mountain ash to current atmospheric CO2 concentration (aCO2), 1.4 times higher CO2 concentration (eCO21.4), and 1.8 times higher CO2 concentration (eCO21.8) in an Open-Top Chamber (OTC) experiment for eight years (2010-2017) to investigate the effect on the morphological and physiological properties of trees. We also assessed whether nitrogen limitation occurred with time by comparing leaf and soil nitrogen concentration. CO2 fertilization effect was observed on tree growth for the first two years (p < 0.05), but there was no difference thereafter. For photosynthetic properties, CO2 effects were species-specific; no effects on Korean red pine and Chinese ash vs. significant effect on Korean mountain ash. However, maximum photosynthetic and carboxylation rates significantly decreased by 24.3% and 31.3% from 2013 to 2017, respectively. Leaf nitrogen significantly decreased by 21.0 % at eCO21.4 and 18.5 % at eCO21.8 compared with aCO2 treatment. This study showed the decline of leaf nitrogen and species-specific responses to long-term high CO2 concentration, which will effect on species competition and ecosystem succession.

  Keywords


Elevated CO2, Photosynthetic Properties, Down-regulation, Progressive Nitrogen Limitation, Carbon dioxide

Authors’ address

(1)
Woo Kyung Song
HoonTaek Lee 0000-0002-6661-8298
Forest Ecology and Climate Change Division, National Institute of Forest Science, Seoul 02455 (Republic of Korea)
(2)
Woo Kyung Song
Si Yeon Byeon
HoonTaek Lee 0000-0002-6661-8298
Min Su Lee
Hyun Seok Kim
Department of Forest Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Republic of Korea)
(3)
Daun Ryu 0000-0002-0782-0859
Hyun Seok Kim
Interdisciplinary Program in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Republic of Korea)
(4)
Jun Won Kang 0000-0002-6859-7750
Department of Forestry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Republic of Korea)
(5)
Sim Hee Han
Forest Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Forest Science, Gyeonggi 16631 (Republic of Korea)
(6)
Chang Young Oh
Urban Forests Research Center, National Institute of Forest Science, Seoul 02455 (Republic of Korea)
(7)
Hyun Seok Kim
National Center for AgroMeteorology, Seoul 08826 (Republic of Korea)
(8)
Hyun Seok Kim
Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Republic of Korea)

Corresponding author

 
Hyun Seok Kim
cameroncrazies@snu.ac.kr

Citation

Song WK, Byeon SY, Lee HT, Lee MS, Ryu D, Kang JW, Han SH, Oh CY, Kim HS (2020). Species-specific morphological and physiological characteristics and progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated CO2 concentration. iForest 13: 270-278. - doi: 10.3832/ifor3288-013

Academic Editor

Silvano Fares

Paper history

Received: Nov 08, 2019
Accepted: May 06, 2020

First online: Jul 03, 2020
Publication Date: Aug 31, 2020
Publication Time: 1.93 months

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